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Tvorup dune plantation

The dune plantations in Thy National Park characterise the area today, but actually the trees and the forests are fairly new in the history of this area. They are a result of targeted efforts which eventually bore fruit, and today the plantations hold great recreational value.

The struggle against the sand

The fight against the destructive sand drift was tough and unfair, and many lessons had to be learned before useful methods to combat the sand were found. The first trial plantations from the early 1800s failed, but in trials in the 1850s new methods were introduced. Lord Hans Christian Riegels was appointed head of the new trials, for example in Tvorup Klit dune. An area of about one acre was planted and sowed, and this time the project was more successful than the trial in Thagaards Plantation(17). The tree varieties used were hardy, and as the new trial area, named Gryden, was further from the sea that the first failed attempt, the conditions were less harsh, so the trees could get a strong hold and grow.

The trials showed that the mountain pine was particularly resistant in the harsh climate. Mountain pine grows fast and forms a shield for more vulnerable tree species planted afterwards. This meant that in the last half of the 1800s, a carpet of mountain pine practically rolled out over the dune areas. This was the beginning of the many hectares of dune plantation that characterise the area today. Over time, the agricultural areas east of the plantations were protected from the sand drift, and the trees also had a noticeable effect on the salty air and sea fog.

A trip in the plantation

The area called Gryden was one of Lord Riegels' trial plantations. Today you can see silver fir, oak, beech and European aspen from the first plantings. At the road, there is a monument of Lord Riegels' work. Through a marked path you can walk around in the undulating landscape which is an old dune landscape. In some places, the sand is up to 6 metres deep, and yet the more than 100-year- old trees are able to grow.

Guests on two wheels can also enjoy the rises and falls in the landscape. A mountain bike route starting at the camp site at Boligvej, north of Tvorup passes closely by Gryden.

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