Go Fishing in the National Park

The landscape in Thy offers excellent fishing opportunities. There are both large and small lakes as well as a long stretch of coastline where both jetties and open beaches provide the setting for sometimes very productive fishing

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With the national fishing license, you can fish along the coasts of the North Sea and Limfjorden. Some lakes in the national park require an additional fishing permit, such as Nors Sø, Vandet Sø, Førby Sø, and Flade Sø. See more in the fact box below.

Everywhere in the national park, fishing is done on nature's terms. Therefore, it is important that anglers comply with the rules for both movement and fishing in the individual areas.

Lakes in National Park Thy

Nors Sø contains unique botany and some exciting fish populations. Among them is the houting, which thrives in the clean, clear water. With a bit of luck, you can catch it along with pike and perch. Waders are necessary, and all boating is prohibited.

Vandet Sø is very similar to Nors Sø in terms of water quality and botany. It contains a fine stock of perch, as well as pike, houting, and whitefish. Waders are necessary.

Førby Sø contains pike and perch.

Flade Sø was formerly part of Krik Vig and is only separated from the North Sea by a thin dune ridge. It is a shallow, brackish lake that was previously the site of targeted commercial fishing for zander. The zander population is still thriving, in such large numbers that theoretically there are too few prey fish in the lake.

Nors Bagsø is located in the southernmost part of Tved Plantation, near the northern shore of Nors Sø. The lake is deepest in the north. There is a handicap-friendly fishing platform with tables and benches. Additionally, there is a campfire site south of the lake. You have the opportunity to catch pike, perch, as well as whitefish such as roach and bream. Fishing in the lake is free, but all caught fish should be released.

Good to know

  • Day permits for Vandet Sø and Nors Sø can be purchased from the Danish Nature Agency (Naturstyrelsen Thy) during their office hours. See their office hours and address here: NST Thy
  • Day permits for Førby Sø + Faddersbølle Å, Bromølle Å, and Nors Sø can be purchased online through fiskekort.dk.
  • Day permits for Flade Sø can be purchased from Krik Marine/Limbo Både, Havne vej 2, Agger Havn in Agger.
  • The national fishing license for individuals between 18 years and pension age can be purchased online: Fishing License
  • Learn more about recreational fishing from the Danish Fisheries Agency: Fiskeristyrelsen
  • Tours to "Det Gule Rev" and more: Angling

Pier fishing and surfcasting

The piers in Hanstholm, Vorupør, and Agger Tange provide access to deep waters where, depending on the season, wind, and currents, anglers have the opportunity to catch true sea fish such as coalfish and saithe. Herring, garfish, and mackerel are often numerous and can make for an entertaining and rewarding fishing experience.

It's also possible to fish along the open coast, and there is untapped potential along the west coast of Thy. The areas around the piers are frequented by anglers throughout the year, but there are fewer anglers out on the beaches.

The shortcut to fresh fish...

On the west coast, the traditional commercial fishing, where boats were launched directly from the beach, is a thing of the past. However, at the landing sites, you can still see recreational fishermen landing catches of crabs and occasionally a beautiful lobster.

Fresh and smoked fish can be purchased in the coastal towns. At the fishmongers, you'll find the various species that inhabit the sea off Thy: cod, whiting, catfish, sculpin, coalfish, plaice, and many others. Remember to buy local fish.

At the fishing bridge at Bagsø, just before you reach Isbjerg, there is free fishing. However, it is customary to release the fish again. Photo: Ib Nord Nielsen.